noble savagery and language April 4, 2011

Danabelle Ignes ENGL 399W Professor Buell 4 April 2011 The Spell of the Sensuous “If our primordial experience is inherently animistic, if our ‘immediate’ awareness discloses a field of phenomena that are all potentially animate and expressive, how can we ever account for the loss of such animateness from the world around us? How canView Full Page…

New World Landscapes February 7, 2011

Manufactured Landscapes Apologies for the lateness of this post. I wanna share this with you this simultaneously beautiful and devastating documentary, Manufactured Landscapes by Edward Burtynsky. Burtynsky provides some shocking statistics and details the process of modern industrialization. At the same time, he documents heaps of material, quarries and crevices left behind by human interventionView Full Page…

Nighthawks November 21, 2010

The title of Edward Hopper’s, perhaps, most famous painting refers to the figures inhabiting the diner. “Nighthawks” has an entirely different connotation than “night owls,” which could easily have been used to name this painting and these people. The night owl, at least in popular Western culture, is an innocuous image, conotating  wisdom and safety.View Full Page…

The Great Gatsby November 15, 2010

“His parents were shiftless and unsuccessful farm people– his imagination had never really accepted them as his parents at all. The truth was that Jay Gatsby, of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God– a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that– andView Full Page…

The Jungle November 7, 2010

“But there was no place could go in Packingtown, if she was particular about things of this sort; there was no place in it where a prostitute could not get along better than a decent girl. Here was a population, low-class and mostly foreign, hanging always on the verge of starvation, and dependent for itsView Full Page…

Monster as Mirror November 3, 2010

The inception of “Frankenstein” is now a legend: While conversing around a fire with Lord Byron and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley, 18 year old Mary Shelley and her companions discussed galvanism and, in friendly competition, decided to pen stories of the supernatural. The resulting novel centers on Victor Frankenstein’s pursuit of the secret “principleView Full Page…

Free Time? October 24, 2010

This is a clock developed by Icelandic product designer, Thorunn Arnadottir. He explains how the clock works on his site(http://thorunndesign.com/Clock.html): “Each bead in the necklace represents 5 minutes, and the whole necklace a one solar day. The orange and red beads represent the whole hours. As the wheel turns, one bead falls off and dropsView Full Page…

The Artifice of Myth October 20, 2010

The desacralization of canonical work is always a tenuous task. As Daniel Defoe’s “Robinson Crusoe” is a bildungsroman of such acclaim and influence, it begs evaluation and re-evaluation for the ideal it perpetuates. Robinson is a prototypically dispensed hero of Capitalist, imperialist Western lore. The son of German immigrants(who, naturally upon naturalization, adopt a lessView Full Page…

Prospero’s Starvation October 4, 2010

Prospero’s Starvation A merciful and conventional way of understanding Prospero in William Shakespeare’s The Tempest is as a representation of the playwright himself. As such, he is perceived to possess greater knowledge than the other characters who operate according to his purportedly benign order. He orchestrates their perceived redemptions and “progress.” The value system thisView Full Page…

A Cruel Deux Ex Machina September 13, 2010

Rather than celebrating the green earth’s bounty by throwing off robes and cavorting naked under the sun in an epicurean frenzy, the protagonist of Sharon Olds’s “Summer Solstice, New York City” chooses the titular occasion as the day of his suicide attempt. The abundance of sunlight in New York city does not illuminate nature but,View Full Page…